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A girl who is probably too sardonic for her own good.
Film, TV, Comics, Literature, Male Objectification.
jessemybabyblue:

THE WRITER OF OZYMANDIAS, MOIRA WALLEY-BECKETТ

How did you end up working on Breaking Bad?
I came on board in Season 2. I was obsessed with the show after watching it in Season One. I was working on another show at the time and the writer’s strike hit and suddenly I had all this time on the picket line and I just couldn’t stop thinking about Breaking Bad.
So I wrote a spec script and my agent was like, “Don’t fucking do that. That’s ridiculous. You can’t write a spec script on a show you actually want to work on. You have to write a spec script of some other cable show and then I can get it to Vince Gilligan’s producers. But I can get kind of crazy obsessive like that and I just had the need to write it. I had the characters voices stuck in my head. On the very day I was being offered a job on a network show my agent got me a meeting with Melissa Bernstein, one of the producers on Breaking Bad, basically just to shut me up. I went in and met her and I mentioned that I’d written a spec and she was like, “Really?” She was completely shocked and said that Vince would be so thrilled to know that someone loved the show enough to write a spec.
I felt like a goofy fan girl (which I was) and when she asked me “What’s it about?” I just sort of pitched it out. I guess she liked the pitch because she was like, “Wow. Can I read it?” and I said, “I’m pretty sure there’s like six reasons why not.” And she looks me in the eye and says, “Can I read it?”. It was a Vegas moment. A gamble. At this point I’m getting offered another job that afternoon and I haven’t finished Act 4 of the Breaking Bad spec. I told her she could read it and I’d get it to her the next morning.
So, I went to the job interview. They offered me the job. I went home. I finished Act 4 that night. I sent it to my agent the next morning, a Friday. He read it. He sent it to Melissa. Melissa read it. She sent it to Vince. Come Monday, I’m sitting by the phone thinking, “What’s going to happen in my life?” And the other show is going, “Okay, we made the offer when are you going to counter? What’s happening?” and we’re like, “Just a second.” I didn’t hear anything all day. It was the world’s longest day, let me tell you.
Finally, at 4 o’clock that Monday afternoon I get a call. “Vince Gilligan wants to meet you.” So I jumped in my car and raced across town and… it was kismet. He uttered the best sentence ever to me. With his sweet Virginia accent, he says, “I don’t know how you did that. I don’t know how you knew the characters so well, but my intention is to offer you a job — I just don’t know if I have a job to offer.” And I was like, “I’ll TAKE IT!” and he’s like, “Wait, wait, wait you better talk to your agent. Because we don’t even have a pickup and I don’t know what’s going to happen.”And I was like, “I’ll TAKE IT!”
So I turned down the other job and I waited. I waited for over 6 weeks to hear if there was even going to be any more Breaking Bad at all. Finally, they got picked up for Season Two and I’ve been on the show ever since.

jessemybabyblue:

THE WRITER OF OZYMANDIAS, MOIRA WALLEY-BECKETТ

How did you end up working on Breaking Bad?

I came on board in Season 2. I was obsessed with the show after watching it in Season One. I was working on another show at the time and the writer’s strike hit and suddenly I had all this time on the picket line and I just couldn’t stop thinking about Breaking Bad.

So I wrote a spec script and my agent was like, “Don’t fucking do that. That’s ridiculous. You can’t write a spec script on a show you actually want to work on. You have to write a spec script of some other cable show and then I can get it to Vince Gilligan’s producers.
But I can get kind of crazy obsessive like that and I just had the need to write it. I had the characters voices stuck in my head.

On the very day I was being offered a job on a network show my agent got me a meeting with Melissa Bernstein, one of the producers on Breaking Bad, basically just to shut me up. I went in and met her and I mentioned that I’d written a spec and she was like, “Really?” She was completely shocked and said that Vince would be so thrilled to know that someone loved the show enough to write a spec.

I felt like a goofy fan girl (which I was) and when she asked me “What’s it about?” I just sort of pitched it out.
I guess she liked the pitch because she was like, “Wow. Can I read it?” and I said, “I’m pretty sure there’s like six reasons why not.” And she looks me in the eye and says, “Can I read it?”. It was a Vegas moment. A gamble.
At this point I’m getting offered another job that afternoon and I haven’t finished Act 4 of the Breaking Bad spec. I told her she could read it and I’d get it to her the next morning.

So, I went to the job interview. They offered me the job. I went home. I finished Act 4 that night. I sent it to my agent the next morning, a Friday. He read it. He sent it to Melissa. Melissa read it. She sent it to Vince.
Come Monday, I’m sitting by the phone thinking, “What’s going to happen in my life?” And the other show is going, “Okay, we made the offer when are you going to counter? What’s happening?” and we’re like, “Just a second.” I didn’t hear anything all day. It was the world’s longest day, let me tell you.

Finally, at 4 o’clock that Monday afternoon I get a call. “Vince Gilligan wants to meet you.”
So I jumped in my car and raced across town and… it was kismet. He uttered the best sentence ever to me. With his sweet Virginia accent, he says, “I don’t know how you did that. I don’t know how you knew the characters so well, but my intention is to offer you a job — I just don’t know if I have a job to offer.” And I was like, “I’ll TAKE IT!” and he’s like, “Wait, wait, wait you better talk to your agent. Because we don’t even have a pickup and I don’t know what’s going to happen.”And I was like, “I’ll TAKE IT!”

So I turned down the other job and I waited. I waited for over 6 weeks to hear if there was even going to be any more Breaking Bad at all.
Finally, they got picked up for Season Two and I’ve been on the show ever since.

2 weeks ago @ 16:01 with 612 notes   (FROM, ORIG.)

1 month ago @ 22:20 with 146,531 notes   (FROM, ORIG.)
#damn   #bamfs   

Gugu Mbath-Raw and James Norton with director, Amma Asante, on the set of Belle (2014).

Gugu Mbath-Raw and James Norton with director, Amma Asante, on the set of Belle (2014).

3 months ago @ 11:55 with 99 notes   (FROM, )
#bamfs   

I always write with Bill in mind. Wes Anderson

Wes’s movies keep getting better, but wait until you see this next one, this Grand Budapest Hotel, this is like a Time Square billboard dropped on your head. It’s amazing. He’s just great fun. We’ve become great friends and I really love him. He has his own fashion sense, that’s for sure, and he tries to dress everyone in the movies like himself, which is really cruel… Your pants cuffs never reach your shoes. Bill Murray

The only other time I saw him before we started filming (for Rushmore) in Texas was at the Four Seasons in Los Angeles. I needed to get a photo of him so that we could have a painting made for the set. I shot a whole roll of film; the first shot was the best. Then we ended up having some drinks at the bar downstairs, and Bill took the place over and started dancing. That was the first experience I had of how a room could get swept up by him. Wes Anderson

I really love the way Wes writes with his collaborators, I like the way he shoots, and I like HIM,” he gushed. “I’ve become so fond of him. I love the way that he has made his art his life. And you know, it’s a lesson to all of us, to take what you love and make it the way you live your life, and that way you bring love into the world. Bill Murray

6 months ago @ 17:33 with 528 notes   (FROM, ORIG.)
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anthonymackies:

Chiwetel Ejiofor and Steve McQueen photographed by Peter Hapak.

7 months ago @ 19:36 with 5,503 notes   (FROM, ORIG.)
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Martin Scorsese and Steve McQueen speak onstage at the 66th Annual Directors Guild of America Awards Feature Film Symposium

7 months ago @ 21:41 with 1,156 notes   (FROM, ORIG.)
lottereinigerforever:

Wong Kar Wai on the set of “The Grandmaster”

lottereinigerforever:

Wong Kar Wai on the set of “The Grandmaster”

7 months ago @ 19:39 with 229 notes   (FROM, )
#bamfs   
pickledelephant:

Guillermo del Toro on the set of Pacific Rim (2013)

pickledelephant:

Guillermo del Toro on the set of Pacific Rim (2013)

9 months ago @ 17:03 with 433 notes   (FROM, ORIG.)
#bamfs   

It was late in the meal when I mentioned his reputation among other journalists. He held his chopsticks in his hand.

“What did they say?”

Steve McQueen is 44 years old, tall and robust; he wore a T-shirt beneath a lightweight sport jacket and dark slacks and large black-rimmed glasses. He is exacting in his ideas, and sometimes struggles to communicate exactly what he’s thinking (he has occasionally borrowed reporters’ pens and paper to help him articulate his thoughts). He is full of energy.

“That I’m difficult?” he asked.

I rattled off some other descriptions: “curt,” “combative,” “volatile,” “scornfully dismissive,” “bullish,” “arrogant.” He pondered it a bit more. He asked whether I had an idea why this reputation exists. I told him I was more interested in his. “It’s journalists getting uppity, and when I get uppity, they write this.” It was an easy caricature: They expect him to be “from the ghetto,” he said, “to behave a certain way.”

“Excuse me for saying it,” he said, “but I suppose it’s because I’m black.”

Steve McQueen is not fucking around! (via mizoguchi)

9 months ago @ 18:33 with 611 notes   (FROM, ORIG.)
#bamfs   
walkerartcenter:

Steve McQueen, photographed by Gene Pittman.

walkerartcenter:

Steve McQueen, photographed by Gene Pittman.

10 months ago @ 17:36 with 965 notes   (FROM, ORIG.)
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11 months ago @ 18:22 with 25 notes   (FROM, )
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Edgar Wright behind the scenes of Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010)

Edgar Wright behind the scenes of Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010)

11 months ago @ 17:58 with 454 notes   (FROM, )
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I love movies, and I love TV. In TV, you have the time to get deeper into a character, but movies are a two-hour block of time in which we get transported to another place. We’ll always have Paris, and we’ll always have movies. But we’re going through a time, unfortunately, when the big movie studios are run by folks that are more obsessed than ever with the bottom line and who probably love movies less than any studio hierarchy that’s ever existed in my life. Back in the day, when the Irving Thalbergs and Louis B. Mayers ran the business, those guys could bite your head off. Those guys were tough sons of bitches, but they loved movies. They weren’t obsessed with counting beans. The problem with the movie business now is that it’s marketing-driven—driven by demographics, by spreadsheets and flowcharts and all this shit that has nothing to do with storytelling. But the movie itself, the structure of the movie, will always be with us. And occasionally a really great movie for grown-ups does sneak through.

Vince Gilligan (Vulture)

12 months ago @ 09:30 with 9 notes   (FROM, )
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Steve Mcqueen at the ‘12 Years a Slave’ Press Conference.

1 year ago @ 21:12 with 4,093 notes   (FROM, )

"I believe that Jack is one of the best actors in Hollywood, perhaps on a par with the greatest stars of the past like Spencer Tracy and James Cagney. I should think that he is on almost everyone’s first-choice list for any role which suits him. His work is always interesting, clearly conceived and has the X-factor, magic. Jack is particularly suited for roles which require intelligence. He is an intelligent and literate man, and these are qualities almost impossible to act. In The Shining, you believe he’s a writer, failed or otherwise.” - Stanley Kubrick

"I believe that Jack is one of the best actors in Hollywood, perhaps on a par with the greatest stars of the past like Spencer Tracy and James Cagney. I should think that he is on almost everyone’s first-choice list for any role which suits him. His work is always interesting, clearly conceived and has the X-factor, magic. Jack is particularly suited for roles which require intelligence. He is an intelligent and literate man, and these are qualities almost impossible to act. In The Shining, you believe he’s a writer, failed or otherwise.” - Stanley Kubrick

1 year ago @ 10:36 with 525 notes   (FROM, )
#bamfs